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Caloundra Lighthouses

The lighthouses on sunshinecoastplaces

When the operational life of the 1967 concrete signal station and light was over, it was possible to relocate the old 1896 "timber and tin" structure back to it's original position

 

 

 

 

 

The work began as a lobbying exercise, through the National Trust, to generate interest in the project, and followed with a conservation plan, then the relocation and conservation works.

The lower window showing rusting of the corrugated iron before conservation work began.

 

 

 

 

Both buildings, but the old lighthouse in particular, will continue to enjoy icon status within the town. The precinct has potential to become an important community focus and stopping point for visitors. The project received a commendation at the RAIA 2000 Queensland awards.

 

 

 

 

 

The lighthouse in approx 1920-22, photo by Mrs Dulcie Kelly nee Birrell, courtesy Caloundra Library Local Studies collection. Dulcie was the daughter of Oliver Birrell, lighthouse keeper from 1918-31, and recalled "things like the lighthouse flagpole my father always dressed up for New Years Day...the first Post Office, within our house beside the light". The lighthouse keepers and their families were an important part of early Caloundra's social history.

 

 

 

After the new concrete lighthouse was built in 1967, the old lighthouse stood beside it for about three years until the Caloundra Power Boat Club saved it from demolition by moving it to Golden Beach. The 1970 photo, taken by Leiut. Col. Alf Easton, then Commodore of the Power Boat Club, shows the tower being lifted. The marks left by the steel cable can still be seen in the corrugated iron. The building lacked a viable use at Golden Beach and deterioration escalated.

 

 

 

 

 

The lantern ready for transporting in 1999 with the tower and Power Boat Club in the background. The corrosion in the lantern is apparant.The base had also deteriorated, and its condition was such that a structural failure occured when it was lifted and positioned ready for transportation. The lower part of the tower dropped about one meter onto the road. Fortunately the damage was able to be repaired.

 

 

 

Transporting the tower up Arthur St, the Glasshouse Mountains can be seen in the background.

 

 

 


The final lift from the carpark. The structure of the damaged portion had been repaired, however final sheeting was done once the building was back in position.

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